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Birth of a Nation

Lacking in drama and embarrassingly undemocratic, Canada’s origins owe a lot to old-fashioned politics and not much to European battles or transcontinental railways. more »

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City Apart

Cities can divide their nations. more »

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In Praise of Ronald Wright

"Authenticity is the essential quality of all travel literature, imaginary or real." more »

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Acts of Resistance

"Resistance to wars is as much a Canadian tradition as fighting them." Daniel Francis discusses alternative histories, anti-draft demonstrations and the divisive nature of war. more »

Columns

The Armenian Question

"Sometimes, in politics or history, certain words, certain names are sufficient unto themselves: it is as if there were names that once pronounced require no further telling." more »

Columns

Immigrants from Nowhere

Stephen Henighan asks: what if you don't have a tidy answer to "Where are you from?" more »

Columns

Fist

Alberto Manguel examines the rich symbology of the fist, a primal symbol of rebellion and grief, across cultures and history. more »

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Cross-Country Snow

"Cross-country skiing offered me the reassurance sought by the immigrant who is excluded from his locality’s history: a viable alternate route to belonging." more »

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Time for a Rewrite

Aboriginal people are creating a new version of Canada, and non-Aboriginals can lend a hand or get out of the way—Daniel Francis on the new Canadian narrative. more »

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Monsters

We believe in monsters, but do we want to take responsibility for them? more »

Columns

Campus Confidential

"In the public eye, universities have never recovered from the antics of Donald Sutherland as Professor Jennings in the 1978 film Animal House." more »

Columns

Park In Progress

Daniel Francis asks why a high-speed commuter route runs through Stanley Park, Vancouver's precious urban oasis. more »

Columns

Not Finishing

"A library is never finished, only abandoned." Alberto Manguel on incompletion, voluntary interruption and the pleasure of the day before. more »

Columns

When Treatment Becomes Torture

Daniel Francis discusses Canada's failing mental health care system and its long history of mistreatment. more »

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Iberian Duet

The assumption of mutual comprehensibility between speakers of Spanish and Portuguese creates a culture of mutual ignorance. more »

Columns

We Are Not a Nation of Amnesiacs

"Canadians have long been convinced that we do not know much, or care much, about our own history, but a new study suggests that this truism is not true." more »

Columns

A Novel for All Times

Alberto Manguel's column from Geist 93 about how the most important Turkish novelist of modern times took over fifty years to reach English-speaking audiences. more »

Columns

Who Cares Who Ate John Franklin?

Daniel Francis on John Franklin, John Rae and the Globe and Mail's enthusiasm for cannibalism. more »

Columns

Fighting Words

A look back at World War I as the first great twentieth-century pollution of language. more »

Columns

Offend

The writer who is loved by all, by definition, neglects literature’s prime responsibility: to offend. more »

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