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Geist 54

A first-hand account of Greenpeace's first expedition to stop U.S. underwater nuclear testing on September 15, 1971. more

Essays

From "The Benefits of Being Burned," a chapter in Canada's Boreal Forest, by J. David Henry (Smithsonian Natural History Series). more

ETC

On th train, back from th Empressdining car, snowing woodlands,pulling thru Manitoba, recallhow sum yrs after th second centenaryof th founding of Halifax, whichdate i commemorated with signabove my father’s street door more

FICTION

A glossary of acronyms and initialisms designed for the note-passing phases of high-school courtship, from 2gether 4ever: Notes of a Junior High School Heartthrob by Dene Larson, published in 2004 by Chronicle Books. more

Lists

We were setting fires in a dry gulch in the hills at the edge of town, with crumpled sagebrush and bits of tumbleweed and no paper for kindling, and we had to start our own fire with a single match the way they did in the Cub Scout troop that met Thursday nights in the basement of St. Paul’s Anglican church on Battle Street. more

Dispatches

Mary Meigs and her friend Lise Weil, editor of Beyond Recall, met regularly to do freewriting together. For each exercise they chose a line or phrase from the work of a poet they both admired; then, inspired by that "prompt," both women wrote for five or ten minutes, recording whatever came to mind (and hand). more

Essays

Having a sweet spot for someone isn’t the same as being in love more

Short Stories

My greatest difficulty at eighty-five is to think coherent thoughts. I want to think about old age and instead my blurry eyes are drawn away from this paper by the movement of spring leaves, yellow-green, outside the window. more

Essays

In early March 2003, when I arrived in Taiwan to teach English, I took to the streets of Taoyuan County to take some photographs. I was looking for anything—signs, market scenes, strange faces, cityscapes, bus stations, barber shops—but all I could see was dogs. These dogs were not pets, though they may once have been. They were strays—dogs that lived on their own. more

Dispatches

"There are people," Chateaubriand comments, "who, in the midst of the collapse of empires, visit fountains and gardens" more

Columns

Two days later I took Wayman’s workshop, Catching Fire, which was guaranteed to inspire us to get writing. He told us, among other things, that once we became writers we would no longer read for pure pleasure because we would always be analyzing what more

Reviews

Eduardo Galeano’s Soccer in Sun and Shadow (Verso) collects his ruminations on the history and future of soccer, and consists of vignettes describing famous players, unlikely goals and every World Cup final since 1930. more

Reviews

Writing on the Rock, which takes place on Denman Island, B.C., in early August, is now my favourite writers’ festival. more

Reviews

Two days later I took Wayman’s workshop, Catching Fire, which was guaranteed to inspire us to get writing. He told us, among other things, that once we became writers we would no longer read for pure pleasure because we would always be analyzing what more

Reviews

In Astrid van der Pol’s poetry collection, Invisible Lines (BuschekBooks), the past is the most hopeful, whereas each new future enters some form of sadness. more

Reviews

The question you have to ask yourself when you finish reading One Ring Circus: Extreme Wrestling in the Minor Leagues, by Brian Howell is this:do I want to become a minor league wrestler? The answer is yes. more

Reviews

Homemade red wine in pop bottles and sausage-making/family-bonding sessions are aspects of my heritage that I had never seen reflected until I read Mamma Mia! Good Italian Girls Talk Back (ECW), collected by Maria Coletta McLean. more

Reviews

Bannock, Beans & Black Tea by the writer/comix artist Seth, is a small, beautiful, disturbing and touching book in which Seth has compiled, edited and illustrated his father’s stories of growing up poor—really poor—in St. Charles, P.E.I. more

Reviews

Patty: What I liked about Alan Cumyn’s The Sojourn (McClelland and Stewart) is the way he thrusts us into a muddy trench in the middle of World War I, where the narrator is carrying a load of something called iron pig’s tails on his shoulders and his more

Reviews

The protagonist of The Cripple and His Talismans by Anosh Irani (Raincoast) is a self-centred, self-absorbed, wealthy-but-have-chosen-to-live-among-the-crippled-and-poor-in-Bombay man. more

Reviews

ADVICE FOR THE LIT-LORN
WRITING QUESTIONS, QUANDARIES & PICKLES

How can academic writers apply your advice to keep prose simple and direct?

—Sentence Spinner, Port Alberni BC

Read the answer from Geist Editors!

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