RSS

Geist 55

First prize winner of the 1st Annual Geist Literal Literary Postcard Story Contest. more

Postcard Story Contest

Third prize winner of the 1st Annual Geist Literal Literary Postcard Story Contest. more

Postcard Story Contest 1 Comments

"She took the starfish home and they ate sushi and green-tea ice cream and then made love on the living room floor in front of a crackling fire." more

Postcard Story Contest

Clare Coughlan reviews her experience seeing (and before that, waiting in line to see) The Love Crimes of Gillian Guess. more

Reviews

Pictoral postcards were authorized by the Canadian post office in 1903, and the next 25 years became known to postcard collectors as the Golden Age. more

PHOTOGRAPHY

"Leading Men” is taken from a work-in-progress, Cinéma-Verité and the Collected Works of Ronald Reagan: A History of Propaganda in Motion Pictures. more

Essays

"'Goin’ to university' was a cover or alibi, rather than a statement of fact, providing the indolent and the imaginative with richer lives than simply having a job." more

Dispatches

One day in Vancouver in the late seventies, Pierre Berton and John Diefenbaker appeared at the same time in the book department at Eaton’s department store to sign copies of their new books, which had just been released by rival publishers. more

Dispatches

A list of overused book review terms from achingly beautiful to woefully inadequate. more

Reviews

The worst time for your pet to run away is when you are moving, and my family moved a lot. more

Dispatches

Some years ago, Susan Crean amusingly suggested that nations might be defined or understood through their emblematic children’s books and according to whether the protagonist was male or female. more

Columns

After last call at three a.m. the sun on the horizon like a giant lodestar would guide us over uneven boardwalks and dirt roads toward the George Black Ferry, across the mud-fed Yukon River to where our hidden world of tents lay inside a maze of birch, where branches knocked and clacked in the wind like the restless bones of ghosts, where someone always screamed blue murder back at the landlocked sled dogs as they cried and howled at the lingering season and stunning lack of darkness inside the night... more

FICTION

In High Tide: The Truth About Our Climate Crisis (Picador), Mark Lynas, a British journalist, describes his travels around the world in search of disaster stories. more

Reviews

During World War II, Gunda Lambton and her two young children left England to live in Canada. more

Reviews

Best commentary on global politics: the riveting documentary Mondovino, in the tradition of several recently published books that scrutinize civilization by looking at the history of such things as salt and Camembert cheese. The film begins with an i more

Reviews

Everything you need to know about Anarchism in Canada can be found in Only A Beginning: An Anarchist Anthology (Arsenal Pulp), an enormous collection of anarchist writing and publishing in this country since 1976. Here is recorded the genesis and pas more

Reviews

An established experimental poet—the kind that comes with a beard and a fear of proper capitalization—was heard recently to denounce video art as “arty farty stuff.” As a writer and sometime video artist myself, I like to think of the two disciplines more

Reviews

J. G. Farrell’s version of a prison is the British Residency in the fictional Krishnapur. There a group of ex-pats take shelter when Indian peasant soldiers turn on their British colonizers and slaughter four hundred of them in a nearby settlement. more

Reviews

In November while on a trip to Toronto, I went to see the play No Great Mischief, based on the novel by Alistair MacLeod. It was a foot-stompin’ good time (only in very small measure due to the No Great Mischief Special—Glen Breton single malt at $7. more

Reviews

I found an answer at another film, Alan Zweig’s I, Curmudgeon. Zweig, a Canadian director, is known for his documentary Vinyl, which delved into the strange world of obsessive record collectors. more

Reviews

ADVICE FOR THE LIT-LORN
WRITING QUESTIONS, QUANDARIES & PICKLES

What’s the difference between weather and weather conditions? CBC Radio hosts use both, in equally solemn voices, but “weather conditions” sounds somehow more threatening than “weather.” Is it?

—Evelyn, Cyberspace

Read the answer from Geist Editors!

---
KEEP IN TOUCH WITH GEIST

---
EMAIL
FIRST NAME
LAST NAME
PROVINCE



nub_300x250.jpg

Geist Gallery