RSS

Geist 68

Michael Hayward reviews Atlantic Books' series of 'Books That Shook the World' and Alberto Manguel's biography of Homer's the Iliad and the Odyssey. more

Reviews

Michael Hayward reviews Phantom Limb by Theresa Kishkan, a series of essays exploring of the complexity and magic of the natural world. more

Reviews

When the celebrated English poet Rupert Brooke came to Canada on the train from New York in 1913, he had been warned that he would find “a country without a soul.” The gloomy streets of Montreal, overshadowed by churches and banks and heavy telephone wires, reminded him of the equally gloomy streets of Glasgow and Birmingham. more

Dispatches

For most of her adult life, my mother, Danuta Rago, was a professional photographer in Poland. In the early seventies she travelled to the Asiatic republics of the ussr and to Siberia. Her assignment was to take portraits of happy members of the coll more

PHOTOGRAPHY

Several years ago Ian McKay, a Queen’s University history professor, published a book called The Quest of the Folk: Antimodernism and Cultural Selection in Twentieth-Century Nova Scotia (McGill-Queen’s University Press) in which he argued that the image many of us have of Nova Scotia as a tartan-wearing, bagpipe-squealing mini-Scotland is pretty much a fabrication. more

Columns

Bologna, Italy, known as both “the Fat” and “the Red,” is a city to a make a bookish vacationer salivate. Less overrun by package tours than Rome, Florence or Venice, Bologna combines superb food with the wonderful bookstores that seem to be the inevitable companion of left-wing politics. more

Columns 1 Comments

Art museums and geographical exp­loration curiously share a common story. The first chapter of the story takes place in Peru. In 1540, the conquistador Gonzalo Pizarro, lost in the strange Amazonian jungle, entrusted one of his men, Francisco de Orellana, to take their remaining brigantine and set off down the Napo River in search of provisions. more

Columns

Reid Fleming, World's Toughest Milkman, whose catchphrase was "I thought I told you to shut up," first appeared in 1978 in the Georgia Straight (Vancouver). more

Comix

From the great hopeful someday, published by conundrum press in 2007. more

Comix

From Southern Cross: A Novel of the South Seas, re-issued in Canada in 2007 by Drawn & Quarterly and originally published in 1951 in a small edition by Ward Ritchie Press. more

Comix

louis riel liked back bacon & eggs easyover   nothing’s as easy as it seems tho   when the waitress cracked the eggs open louis came to his guns blazing   like dissolution like the fingers of his hand coming apart as he squeezed the trigger more

FICTION

Three walked barefoot into the sea,mother, father and only childwith trousers rolled above the knee.A stretch of water—half a mile;granite loaves made a cobbled road when the tide was low. Tide was high. more

FICTION

This photo was taken in Winnipeg’s North End at St. John’s Park on Main Street, in 1940 or so. I was about five years old and the only girl in the family. An accident, my parents told me. A happy accident. more

PHOTOGRAPHY

Literary sounds from The Don Martin Dictionary. more

Lists

. . . who came on his Vespa wearing an army cap and fatigues, and smelling of rose attar, and I asked him, look, I had this problem in the States . . . more

Prose

louis riel liked back bacon & eggs easyover   nothing’s as easy as it seems tho   when the waitress cracked the eggs open louis came to his guns blazing   like dissolution like the fingers of his hand coming apart as he squeezed the trigger more

Poetry

Carl Bernstein. Reporter. Author. Political analyst.Jackson Browne. Singer. Songwriter. Eagles enabler.John Daly. Golfer.Daniel Day-Lewis. Actor. Academy Award winner. Crazy Irish guy. more

Lists

When Al Purdy got up for his turn and peered down at us, the crown of his head almost grazed the bank of fluorescent tubes on the ceiling, or so it seemed to us—or seems to me now. In a big, barging voice he prefaced his reading by asking what we had more

Prose

When I started working here at the Potluck Café people yelled at me. I was too old and slow and some of the residents were angry that I was there and not the girl before. Then one day I came in and thought, Oh there’s flowers here, I’m going to wear them. I asked Johnny my boss if I could wear flowers in my ears, he said sure so I started wearing them to cut the ice. I wore them for every person. They’d say, I like your flowers. I’d say I’m wearing them for you. more

UNKNOWN

Among the people who live outside the Dominion building in downtown Vancouver, across the street from the cenotaph at Victory Square, is a woman who might be in her late forties and who occasionally turns up in a wedding dress. I’ve never seen her speak to anyone. She simply walks up and holds out her empty hand toward you. more

Dispatches

ADVICE FOR THE LIT-LORN
WRITING QUESTIONS, QUANDARIES & PICKLES

What’s the difference between weather and weather conditions? CBC Radio hosts use both, in equally solemn voices, but “weather conditions” sounds somehow more threatening than “weather.” Is it?

—Evelyn, Cyberspace

Read the answer from Geist Editors!

---
KEEP IN TOUCH WITH GEIST

---
EMAIL
FIRST NAME
LAST NAME
PROVINCE



nub_300x250.jpg

Geist Gallery