How does narrative die?

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Doing things

We dropped the threads of our narratives when we lost movement and action in our daily lives: the fleshy, physical doings of things.

The subjects of our current 'stories' are un-embodied to begin with. They float in two-dimensional spaces: ether, internet, journals, ads. So we situate ourselves predominately in the intransitive: in non-space, in binary.

To connect with this text, with its author, with its sense, I had to sit, read, click and type a path through non-physical space towards Geist.com. There aren't many creative ways to describe that process, nor many opportunities for me to disturb the forms I use to do those actions. We now connect to the world through a stifled, homogenized series of verbs. So we don't bother to list them.

Even when I interview dancers and choreographers, I sometimes struggle to describe their real live bodies and actions.

Who's at fault? The author, for failing to describe any real activity, or the subjects of the story, for failing to walk, breathe, move, do actual things in everyday life?

Lucy May more than 1 year ago

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