Writing It Out: Palliative Care and Poetry

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Ooops, all the lines fell out

Ooops, all the lines fell out of the above poem when I posted it.

Arnold Porter more than 4 years ago

This is an interesting

This is an interesting artlcle. As a hospice counsellor who writes poetry, I am interested in your project and to its applicability to our work here at Victoria Hospice. Perhaps you could tell me whaty the two assignments you offer your patients are (besides the offer to write a poem for them? Thank you for your help

Here's a poem of mine so you can see what I'm doing. Arnold

A THOUSAND

A thousand houses,
A thousand trinkets:
Paintings, knickknacks, Christmas cards,
Pictures of family, of kids growing up,
A thousand beds,
A thousand families,
Sons, Daughters, Husbands, Wives,
Caring, distraught, laughing, crying,
Counting time in days,
As sunlight comes and goes
Across the carpets
Across the walls,
As the moon and street lamps
Shine in the windows.
A thousand pill bottles
A thousand bouquets
A thousand injections
As a thousand actors take their bow and
—in their own way—
Leave this stage.


A. Porter

Arnold Porter more than 4 years ago

ADVICE FOR THE LIT-LORN
WRITING QUESTIONS, QUANDARIES & PICKLES

"I recently started writing my first book, a memoir, but I am unsure how to write something so long. I have a good idea of what I want to include and focus on, but when I think about how to sustain a story over the course of two hundred pages or so, I become intimidated and confused. Do you have any advice on how to make writing a long project more manageable?"

—Rebecca, Ottawa ON

Read the answer from Geist Editors!
Sponsored by the Humber School for Writers

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