Reviews

How Stories Mean

Geist Staff

How Stories Mean (Porcupine's Quill), a collection of essays on Canadian fiction edited by John Metcalf and Tim Struthers, is a good example of the blue box approach to book-making: almost everything in it is recycled. At least 39 of the 47 essays comprising it have appeared in print already—and not just in magazines or journals, but in other books of essays. Four have been published twice. Twenty-one have been collected in earlier books edited by Metcalfe (who is the self-appointed curmudgeon of Canlit). One is appearing in print for the fourth time. This doesn't mean the essays in this book are necessarily not thoughtful or interesting; many of them are both. It does mean that before forking over $18.95 for this book, make sure you haven't already read most of it elsewhere.

Tags
No items found.

SUGGESTIONS FOR YOU

Dispatches
CONNIE KUHNS

Marriage on the Download

If marriage was a television show, it might look something like this.

Dispatches
Jeremy Colangelo

i is another

"my point that / i is but a : colon grown / too long"

Reviews
Michael Hayward

Vanishing Career Paths

Review of "The Last Bookseller: A Life in the Rare Book Trade" by Gary Goodman, and "A Factotum in the Book Trade" by Marius Kociejowski.