Reviews

Never Let Me Go

In his novel Never Let Me Go (Vintage Canada), Kazuo Ishiguro creates an alternate world in which clones are produced, raised in residential school and taught math, history, art and social skills. As they accumulate knowledge, it dawns on these children that no matter how much they long for ordinary jobs, relationships and lives, they have come to exist for a specific, unalterable purpose. Reading this book is a bit like passing by a multi-vehicle accident: you can’t look, but you can’t tear your eyes away from the horror. Ishiguro’s terrifying dystopian story will compel any reader to keep going, if only driven on by the hope that the children can escape their fate.

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