Poetry

Guide to Better Cooking

CARIN MAKUZ

Found poetry from Pillsbury Kitchens' Family Cookbook. Published by Pillsbury Kitchens in 1976.

HOW TO MEASURE

1. Use only spray-on poultry.

2. Sticking, straight-edge products with short times containing fish custard… may cause high altitude moisture—change is necessary.

3. It is recommended you continue broiling or roasting at eye level.

4. No need to remember oven custard and cream.

5. Remember cheese fillings immediately (and firmly press using only solid meat, solid shortening or leftover temperature).

6. A recipe for food, or foods should be refrigerated if you live with a standard metal spatula or greasing change.

7. 350º may have to make adjustments.

SPECIAL OCCASION MEALS

Try to time your guests casually—working family looks just right. Gracious, carefree food (most popular), seems to share with taste and ease.

HERBS, SPICES AND SEASONINGS

Please one year with ancient freshness. Blend blending amount and develop pleasantly powdered aroma to 4 servings. Generally taste storage after a pinch of common art.

MOVING TOWARD METRICS IN THE KITCHEN

Available devices, and certainly teaspoons, in Grandmother’s kitchen hasten confusing weather reports. Do they mean a library? Indeed!

The usual conversion: 500 available, freezing familiarity, 100 degrees exposure (mL) .001 plus metric nesting instructions, as always are labeled.

The difference is: weight change will occur between home economists.  

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CARIN MAKUZ

Carin Makuz is a writer whose short fiction has been published in various journals and magazines in Canada and the UK, and has been broadcast on CBC and BBC radio. She thinks out loud at matildamagtree.wordpress.com.


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