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Kris Rothstein

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Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Dogs and the Writing Life

Review of "And a Dog Called Fig: Solitude, Connection, the Writing Life" by Helen Humphreys.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Girl Culture

Girl Culture (Chronicle/Raincoast) is a coffee table book that is both attractive and disturbing. Lauren Greenfield’s photographs document how American girls relate to fashion, culture and their bodies as they grow up in the most superficial society

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Grand Centaur Station: Unruly Living with the New Nomads of Central Asia

Nomadic culture is at the core of Larry Frolick’s Grand Centaur Station: Unruly Living with the New Nomads of Central Asia.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Great Granny Webster

In Caroline Blackwood’s slim novel Great Granny Webster (NYRB), set in Britain in the 1940s, a teenage girl is sent to live with her great-grandmother in a lifeless Victorian mansion near Brighton. Sea air has been recommended for her anemia, but the

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Hail Mary Corner

No less harm in God is apparent in Brian Payton’s Hail Mary Corner (Beach Holme), set in a Vancouver Island seminary school in the 1980s. Bill, his best friend Jon and the rest of their pack run the school, promoting disorder, breaking the rules and

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Hinterland Who's Who: The Wood Spider

If you only see one short film this year, see the brilliant and witty Hinterland Who s Who: The Wood Spider, made by Andrew Struthers, a two-minute masterpiece combining old-school National Film Board aesthetic with a very modern tale of culture and

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Hester Among the Ruins

The title character in Binnie Kirshenbaum's Hester Among the Ruins is on the trail of a different kind of treasure. She is the rare historian who does not teach but makes a living from her popular books about medieval life.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Holding Still for as Long as Possible

Kris Rothstein reviews Holding Still for as Long as Possible by Zoe Whittall (Anansi).

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
How the Blessed Live

In Susannah M. Smith’s How the Blessed Live (Coach House), Lucy and Levi are twins who grow up motherless on an island in Lake Ontario.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
I, Curmudgeon

I found an answer at another film, Alan Zweig’s I, Curmudgeon. Zweig, a Canadian director, is known for his documentary Vinyl, which delved into the strange world of obsessive record collectors.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
I’m Special: How Individuality Became the New Conformity

In between films I read Hal Niedzviecki’s new book, Hello I’m Special: How Individuality Became the New Conformity (Penguin). It was inspired by the author’s crisis of faith in underground culture, precipitated by a Hallmark card reading “Happy Birth

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
In Praise of Slow: How a Worldwide Movement is Challenging the Cult of Speed

Carl Honoré isn’t the first author to investigate the phenomenon of slow living, but his book In Praise of Slow: How a Worldwide Movement is Challenging the Cult of Speed (Vintage Canada) is the most comprehensive explanation of recent attention to s

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Peops: Portraits & Stories of People

Peops: Portraits & Stories of People (Soft Skull) by the Canadian artist Fly is a fabulous exploration of the American underground through comics and stories.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Cats of Mirikitani

A perfect antidote to tension and despair is Linda Hattendorf’s remarkable documentary, The Cats of Mirikitani. She is a New York filmmaker who befriended Jimmy Mirikitani, a Japanese-American octogenarian artist who lived on the streets in her neigh

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Diary of a Teenage Girl

In The Diary of a Teenage Girl by Phoebe Gloeckner (Frog Ltd/North Atlantic Books), Minnie Goetze shares her story of growing up in anything-goes 1970s San Francisco, using words, drawings and comics. It’s the year Minnie becomes sexually curious and

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The French Guy

No secret Canadian knowledge will help illuminate The French Guy, the latest film by Ann Marie Fleming. Though it is obviously shot in Vancouver, this absurd story lacks a sense of place, and the central joke about the eponymous French guy falls flat

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Glenwood Treasure

Until I found The Glenwood Treasure by Kim Moritsugu (Dundurn), I thought writers of adult books were ignoring one of the tried-and-true plots of children’s books: the joys and pitfalls of searching for treasure. Blithe is the quiet daughter of swank

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Heart is an Involuntary Muscle

Monique Proulx’s long-awaited novel, The Heart is an Involuntary Muscle (Douglas & McIntyre), is the story of Florence, a web designer leading a safe virtual life. When she finds out that her father’s dying words feature prominently in a book being w

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Last Samurai

I had fun in the gifted class in elementary school because my parents never pressured me to become a sensation in spelling, or science—or, like Maya, the ethereal figure in Nancy Huston’s tense novel Prodigy (McArthur), a brilliant ten-year-old piani

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Interpreter of Maladies

There are few appearances by God in The Interpreter of Maladies (Mariner Books), a Pulitzer Prize-winning collection of short stories by Jhumpa Lahiri. Lahiri’s settings are both secular and multicultural, and the challenge facing her characters is t

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Nervous Tourist

Bob Gaulke’s description of his travels in Salvador (a region of Brazil), in The Nervous Tourist, evokes the age of imperialism. This modest chapbook contains insightful, engaging and funny writing about the eye-opening experience of travel.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Native Heath

Stolen honeycombs, a fiancé training to be a missionary in Africa, a picnic marred by quicksand and fog, a fundraising party for pig pensions...

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Tricks

Kris Rothstein reviewed the 2008 Vancouver International Film Festival. For more reviews, visit her Geist blog at geist.com/blog/kris.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Twenty Miles

Twenty Miles by Cara Hedley (Coach House) hurtles headlong through the chaos of a season of tough young women playing university hockey. Isabel Norris (Iz) is the unlikely heroine of this novel, a pretty girl whose talent for hockey is more of a comp

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Unknown White Male

In 2003 Douglas Bruce rode the subway to Coney Island, having forgotten where he was going and who he was. His friend Rupert Murray was one of many directors interested in bringing this story of complete amnesia to the screen, and Murray’s Unknown Wh

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Whole New Thing

The action in Whole New Thing, a film from Nova Scotia, is also precipitated by self-involved parents. Thirteen-year-old Emerson lives in a remote cabin, where he writes novels, takes saunas and gives massages to his parents’ friends.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Women Who Eat: A New Generation on the Glory of Food

Food and eating are essential parts of our lives but they are seldom given serious thought.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Witch Ball

Sabine Rose, the heroine of Witch Ball by Linda Joy Singleton (Llewellyn), is a psychic. She hides her powers from her popular friends and dreamy boyfriend by day and consults with her spirit guide by night.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
You Be Me: Friendship in the Lives of Teen Girls

As a teen I was never happier than when in cahoots with my best friend, passing silly notes, talking obsessively on the phone, pouring out heartache, even fighting. I expected You Be Me: Friendship in the Lives of Teen Girls (Annick Press), edited by

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
You've Been Warned

Kris Rothstein on a no-nonsense Irish heroine.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Shadow Company

Mercenaries and muscle for hire are the subjects of Shadow Company, a cinematic investigation into the privatization of the use of force. The film was born when a university buddy of the director, Nick Bicanic, took a job as a private military contra

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood

In Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood (Penguin), Koren Zailckas recounts her history of alcohol abuse and the years she lost. She took her first drink at age fourteen and she soon craved liquor and needed it for any kind of social interaction.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Some Girls Do

Clumsy slang and fake angst are what Some Girls Do (do what?) by Teresa McWhirter (Polestar) is all about. While I enjoyed the buoyant conversational style and unconventional characters, I hated McWhirter’s self-conscious portrayal of the subculture

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Souvenir of Canada

Kris Rothstein reviews Souvenir of Canada, which appeared at the 2005 Vancouver International Film Festival, and Douglas Coupland's role in it and appearance at the festival.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Striking the Rich

Kris Rothstein on Fleishman Is in Trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Sun Signs

Kayleigh, the teenage protagonist of Sun Signs by Shelley Hrdlitschka (Orca), is fighting cancer, and her treatments are so intense that she’s been forced to drop out of high school. She completes her schoolwork by correspondence and discusses her as

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Tales of Innocence and Experience

Tales of Innocence and Experience (Bloomsbury) is Eva Figes’s lyrical exploration of the bond between grandmother and granddaughter. In it she takes on the monumental subject of the loss and pain that accompany the acquisition of knowledge.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Art of Travel

Alain de Botton, whose intellect and sense of humour brought us How Proust Can Change Your Life and The Consolations of Philosophy, enters new territory with The Art of Travel (Hamish Hamilton). Here he takes on our fascination with other places and

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Best 10 Minutes of Your Life

The only book of poetry I enjoyed this year is Zoe Whittall’s The Best 10 Minutes of Your Life (McGilligan Books). Here Ally McBeal and Dr. Seuss live alongside Susan Musgrave and Rocket Richard in a mélange of popular culture and literary craving.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Princess Pawn

There’s something comfortingly predictable about a young adult fantasy.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Rebel Sell: Why Culture Cant be Jammed

From its title, The Rebel Sell: Why Culture Can’t be Jammed (HarperCollins) looked like it might be a source of new ideas about resisting the fast-paced corporate world. But the polemic of the authors, Joseph Heath and Andrew Potter, informs us that

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Rest Is Silence

Kris Rothstein reviewed the 2008 Vancouver International Film Festival. For more reviews, visit her Geist blog at geist.com/blog/kris.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Stone Angel

The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence is a classic Canadian novel, and nothing short of a great film would do it justice. Kari Skogland's film is a subtle meditation on Prairie social life and taboos in the mid-twentieth century. It’s also a complex a

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Tracey Fragments

Fifteen-year-old Tracey Berkowitz is on a bus, naked except for a shower curtain. How did she get there? Which pieces of her life story as a misfit are reality and which are fantasy? Director Bruce McDonald tackles these questions by fracturing the s

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Understanding

The Understanding by Jane Barker Wright (Porcupine’s Quill) offers one of the most convincing fictionalizations of seventies hippie culture I’ve ever read. The novel is the story of the bohemian Whitechapel clan; artsy Solly and Isobel and their broo

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Waterproof Bible

Kris Rothstein reviews The Waterproof Bible by Andy Kaufman (Random House).

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
The Virgin Spy

Kris Rothstein reviews The Virgin Spy by Krista Bridges (Douglas & McIntyre).

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
This Divided State

It is strange that a documentary [This Divided State] about a public speech at a small college in Utah should be a near-perfect film about culture, politics and the heights of absurdity. In 2004 the student government of Utah Valley State College inv

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Turbo Chicks: Talking Young Feminists

Kris Rothstein reviews Talking Young Feminists, a collection of essays by young feminist women.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Untitled: A Bad Teen Novel

Tara Ariano wrote Untitled: A Bad Teen Novel (Writers Club Press) when she was thirteen. It is, she claims, “quite awful,” and was only rescued from obscurity because Tara had friends who persuaded her to share her shame with the world.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Nelcott Is My Darling

Alice, the protagonist of Nelcott Is My Darling by Golda Fried (Coach House), has left a sheltered life in Toronto to attend McGill University, where she joins the film society and makes friends who are dangerous and cool—all while trying to hold on

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Night of the Prom

In Night of the Prom (Thirteenth Tiger Press), four authors offer original takes on the prom tradition in poetry and prose.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Pencil Pushers

Kris Rothstein on the current state of employment in Bullshit Jobs and Temp.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Persepolis

This year’s winner of the People’s Choice Award for Most Popular International Film was Persepolis, a mostly black-and-white animated film adapted from the graphic memoir by Marjane Satrapi, who documents her childhood in Iran, first living under the

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Plenty of Harm in God

The Aran Islands are described in my guidebook to Ireland as isolated, rugged and beautiful. In Plenty of Harm in God by Dana Bath (DC Books), they are the setting for a lot of human drama as well.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Fake ID

Kris Rothstein reviews Mariko Tamaki’s Fake ID, a collection of short stories about a young woman who moves to Toronto after finishing university in Montreal.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Fantasy Freaks and Gaming Geeks

Kris Rothstein reviews Fantasy Freaks and Gaming Geeks by Ethan Gilsdorf (Lyons Press).

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Fierce People

In Fierce People by Dirk Wittenborn (Bloomsbury), fifteen-year-old Finn Earl aches to enter the privileged, self-indulgent world inhabited by the billionaire Osborne family and their wealthy friends. One minute he’s trying to cover up his mother’s dr

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Forbidden Lie$

Forbidden Lie$ tells the story of Norma Khouri, who shot to fame when her book, Forbidden Love, became a bestseller. The book claimed to tell the story of Khouri’s best friend, who was murdered by her own family because she dated a man of a different

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
It Is Bliss Here: Letters Home 1939

For Myles Hildyard, a British aristocrat, the Second World War was an adventure like no other. He joined a local military unit in the late 1930s and saw action throughout the entire war, stationed in the Middle East, North Africa, Crete and western E

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Forever

Forever is a Dutch film made by the experienced documentarian Heddy Honigmann. Its subject is Père-Lachaise cemetery in Paris but its scope includes life and death, history and memory, art and beauty.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
King of the Lost & Found

Raymond J. Dunne, the sixteen-year-old hero of John Lekich’s teen novel, King of the Lost & Found (Raincoast), is an outsider.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Make Believe Love

Make Believe Love by Lee Gowan (Vintage Canada) is billed as a tale of “love in the electronic age,” but the high-tech world has little to do with this story of obsession in dreary small-town Saskatchewan. Joan Swift, the town librarian, will never b

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Mall Moll

Kris Rothstein on a book written by a book nerd, for book nerds about a book nerd.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Measures to Better the World

The Germans have upped the ante on absurdity with the film Measures to Better the World (produced by Jörn Hintzer, Jakob Hüfner), which chronicles a series of invented social movements such as the Green Light Society and Rent-a-Brother. In the most c

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Middlesex

Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex (Knopf Canada) is the eighty-year saga of the Stephanides family, who immigrate to America from Greece. It is a conventional tale, except for a few crucial details.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Miss Smithers

Susan Juby's teen novel Miss Smithers—the story of an eccentric but charming girl entering a beauty pageant in a small BC town—is reviewed by Kris Rothstein.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Cat Book

I thought Cat Book by Emily Eve Weinstein (Beau Soleil) would be a collection of too cute stories about people and their cats, but I soon learned not to be fooled by the easy beauty of Weinstein’s cat paintings, which dot the pages, or by the text it

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Chuck Dugan is AWOL

The eponymous hero of Chuck Dugan is AWOL by Eric Chase Anderson (Chronicle) isn’t from Montreal or Toronto but he is struggling through early adulthood in this illustrated old-fashioned adventure story filled with innocence and charm. Chuck Dugan de

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Chinese Restaurant: On the Islands

Most ambitious debut project: Chinese Restaurant: On the Islands, by the Canadian director Cheuk Kwan. Intrigued by the worldwide omnipresence of Chinese restaurants, he travelled to a dozen countries to investigate the experiences of the Chinese dia

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Colour: Travels Through the Paintbox

Victoria Finlay’s Colour: Travels Through the Paintbox (Sceptre) looks like it could be this year’s Salt. But where Mark Kurlansky delivered a precise, fascinating account of the intersections of salt and history, Finlay offers only scattered and ram

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Colonialism and Homosexuality

The promise of exotic and sensuous experience has lured many a European man to go abroad, as Robert Aldrich demonstrates in Colonialism and Homosexuality (Routledge), reviewed by Kris Rothstein.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Cyborg: Digital Destiny and Human Possibility in the Age of the Wearable Computer

Steve Mann, a professor at the University of Toronto, is the subject of Cyberman (2001), a fascinating film by Peter Lynch. He is also a cyborg, a concept he explains in Cyborg: Digital Destiny and Human Possibility in the Age of the Wearable Compute

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Day Shift Werewolf

Supernatural beings seem to have it easy: their purpose in life (or life after death) is clear and their mission to frighten or eat humans should be simple enough. But the creatures in Day Shift Werewolf (3-Day Books) suffer from the same self-doubt,

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Darwin's Bastards

Kris Rothstein reviews Darwin's Bastards (Douglas & McIntyre).

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Decolonizing Canada

Review of "Before I Was a Critic I Was a Human Being" Amy Fung.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Elixirs

Craft Distilling: Making Liquor Legally at Home by Victoria Redhed Miller is a no-nonsense how-to book, and a rational plea to lift laws that prevent small-batch not-for-profit distilling.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Eve and the Fire Horse

When Julia Kwan’s grandmother died, her parents said the grandmother had been reincarnated as a goldfish. The report from Sunday school was quite different: Grandma had gone to hell. Eve and the Fire Horse is Kwan’s story of a young Chinese-Canadian

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Exploits of a Reluctant (But Extremely Goodlooking) Hero

Like Adrian Mole, the famous teenaged diarist created by Sue Townsend, the unnamed hero of Maureen Fergus’s Exploits of a Reluctant (But Extremely Good

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
13

The male characters in Mary-Lou Zeitoun’s 13 (Porcupine’s Quill) include a guidance counsellor who takes nude photos of his adolescent pupils and a music teacher who thinks “drums are not for girls.” No wonder Marnie, the thirteen-year-old protagonis

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
A Cup of Pyms

Pym’s loving but sly take on the world is reminiscent of Jane Austen, but I find Pym funnier and somehow more shrewd and gentle in her satire.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
A Diary 1978–1980

I cringe a little when I think of my old diaries. Luckily, A Diary 1978—1980 by “Shauna” (Two-Star Press) let me relive all of my wacky pre-teen adventures without the embarrassment of my own stupid commentary.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
All Folked Up

Kris Rothstein recounts her experience at the Pickathon, a music festival in Portland, Oregon.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
All Inclusive

Kris Rothstein reviewed the 2008 Vancouver International Film Festival. For more reviews, visit her Geist blog at geist.com/blog/kris.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Anna’s Shadow

Kris Rothstein reviews Anna's Shadow by David Manicom, "much more than just another post-Cold War thriller."

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Austerlitz

W. G. Sebald’s Austerlitz (Vintage Canada) is a serious European novel. This translation (by Anthea Bell) still bears more than just a trace of the heaviness and denseness of the German language, which may discourage some readers.

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Prodigy

I had fun in the gifted class in elementary school because my parents never pressured me to become a sensation in spelling, or science—or, like Maya, the ethereal figure in Nancy Huston’s tense novel Prodigy (McArthur), a brilliant ten-year-old piani

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Rampage

>After filming Elliot Lovett, an American G.I., for a study of soldiers and their music, the Australian documentary filmmaker George Gittoes followed Lovett back to his home in the Brown Sub ghetto in Miami. The neighbourhood he found there was every

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Radiant City

The Canadian director Gary Burns’s take on the urban and suburban condition has always been fictional, until now. Burns teams up with Jim Brown to tackle life in the cul de sac in Radiant City, a film that combines commentary on design, culture and p

Kris Rothstein
Reviews
Screaming at a Wall

Drugs and disillusionment also figure in Greg Everett’s memoir Screaming at a Wall (Grundle Ink), featuring a main character named Greg and events and dialogue that are too convincing to be made up. The charm of this book is its unflinching portrayal

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Kris Rothstein
PuSh 2020: Free Admission
UK performer Ursula Martinez literally bares all in this funny show about building and breaking walls.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh 2020: Cuckoo
The recent history of South Korea, as told by rice cookers.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh 2020: An Interview with Ursula Martinez
UK performer Ursula Martinez shares thoughts on what inspires her and on provocation and rebellion in the arts.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Krabi, 2562
Experimental filmmaker Ben Rivers collaborates with Anocha Suwichakornpong on this very weird project set in a Thai coastal city.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Raf
An oddball introvert is transformed through an intense relationship with a charismatic but manipulative friend.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Pop-Up Magazine
The 'live magazine' show brought stories of a cow on the loose in Alaska, energy healers in Arizona, an uncle who was a disco star in the Philippines, and the secret joy of the televised car chase.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Water Over Glass
Jason Zumpano, a Vancouver musician and composer, creates dreamy vintage-inspired music as inspiration for four filmmakers in this collaborative work.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: MODES 1
A collection of experimental short films encourages immersion in image and sound.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Varda by Agnès
In her final film, French filmmaker Agnès Varda explains her approach to art and creativity with attention to detail and joy.
Kris Rothstein
Bumbershoot Festival
Seattle's annual arts festival is still a lot of fun.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival: City of Dreams
Kris Rothstein
In the Yard, Havin' Fun: A Prison Musical
Kris Rothstein
Only When I Dance - for ballet lovers
Kris Rothstein
Kooks, Ranters and Me
Kris Rothstein
DOXA 2015: Sugar Coated
A harsh expose of Big Sugar!
Kris Rothstein
A Master Builder
Director Jonathan Demme teams up with Wallace Shawn and Andre Gregory for this Henrik Ibsen play adaptation.
Kris Rothstein
Do You Want What I Have Got? A Craigslist Cantata & Distant 2nd: The Steve Fonyo Musical
Kris Rothstein
PuSh 2013: Reich & Rite
Vicky Chow plays Steve Reich and Igor Stravinsky
Kris Rothstein
Canadiana
Kris Rothstein
A film to remind you that writers are jerks
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival: Best Play Worst Play
Performance based on survey about what people like in a play
Kris Rothstein
The Great Contemporary Art Bubble
Kris Rothstein
PuSh 2015: The Hole in the Coffin and 1999
Two different stories told at the piano, with props.
Kris Rothstein
The Be(A)st of Taylor Mac
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival: Guided Tour
An unusual art gallery tour and a probing of history and memory.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival: Happy Birthday Teenage City
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival Looms
Kris Rothstein
DOXA 2015: Deep Web
Down the rabbit hole into the dark, secret corners of the Internet.
Kris Rothstein
The Invisible
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival: Datamatics
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival: La Marea
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2015: Atlantis & The Royal Road
A perfect pairing of films that force the viewer to make the connections between sometimes random shots and images.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF: Song of Tomorrow
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2015: The Anarchists
Stylish French historical drama about a policeman who infiltrates an anarchist cell.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2015: From Scotland with Love
A window into the past with this archival montage.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF promo shorts
Kris Rothstein
VIFF: Palimpsest
Kris Rothstein
VIFF: Alexandria unplugged
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2015: Rainbow Island
An optimistic film about tradition and change on a small Iranian island
Kris Rothstein
VIFF: Mrs Carey's Concert
Australian girls prepare for classical music showcase
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2015: The Sky Trembles and the Earth is Afraid and the Two Eyes are Not Brothers
Ben Rivers does it again with a gorgeous, strange and unsettling film.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2015: Above and Below
Young Swiss documentarian Nicolas Steiner has made an intense film about people living in unusual geographies
Kris Rothstein
Way of Nature, a year on a Swedish farm
Kris Rothstein
JFL NorthWest 2016: Jokes Please
Eclectic and eccentric stand up where we learned that Ryan Albert Hilbert is not a convincing alias.
Kris Rothstein
JFL NorthWest 2016: Todd Barry
Comedy from the king of deadpan.
Kris Rothstein
JFL NorthWest 2016: Instagraham
An amusing journey through the social media platform that sucks the least.
Kris Rothstein
In Search of Indie Films
Why it might be harder to see the next great underground classic film, even in this age of technological plenty.
Kris Rothstein
JFL NorthWest 2016: Janeane Garofalo
Even after almost 90 minutes of intimate self-mockery, Garofalo seems so likable.
Kris Rothstein
BC Distilled and Canadian cocktails
As the festival of BC's craft distilleries approaches, I ponder books on liquor and consider some crazy delicious recipes.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2016: All This Panic
Seven teens in Brooklyn bare all to the camera.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2016: Barakah Meets Barakah
Yes, Saudi Arabians can make romantic comedies.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2016: The Infinite Flight of Days
Jericó, a small town in the Colombian Andes, is illuminated through the lives of its female elders. Charming, gorgeous, heart-breaking.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2017: Sour Apples
A few decades in the lives of Turkish sisters transport the audience from rural mountain life to the modern big city in this funny, emotional film which is both sweet and sour.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: Canadian Short Films
Every kind of film under the sun: dozens of shorts explore personal history, landscape, memory and pathos.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival 2018: History History History
Deborah Pearson screens a Hungarian political satire about soccer interspersed with commentary and a family quest.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival 2018: Foxconn Frequency (no. 3)
Cacophony and spectacle in a truly genre-defying work of lights, noise, numbers and keyboards.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: L.A. Tea Time
French-Canadian filmmaker Sophie Bédard Marcotte's documentary takes us on a road trip to Los Angeles in search of artistic direction.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Marghe and Her Mother
Iranian filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf has a new film, made in Italy, and it is utterly original and makes a long-lasting impression.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Neutra - Survival Through Design
A modernist architect gets his due in this stylish documentary.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Cranks
An artsy ode to weirdos and the city of Winnipeg, inspired by a notorious call-in radio show.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2017: Dina
A documentary love story from the 'non-typical' end of the neurological spectrum which is honest and intimate without exploiting its subjects.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: The New Romantic
Sexual politics in the age of Tinder are portrayed with skill and insight in this Canadian comedy about a young woman who contemplates becoming a sugar baby.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: The Proposal
A searing artistic investigation into who should own and control creative output.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: MS Slavic 7
A young woman investigates correspondence between two poets in the mid twentieth-century: her great-grandmother and the Nobel prize nominee Józef Wittlin.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Nomad - In the Footsteps of Bruce Chatwin
Werner Herzog memorializes Bruce Chatwin, in a fantastic film. “I will follow a similar erratic quest for wild characters, strange dreamers and big ideas about the nature of human existence.”
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2019: Fourteen
A woman watches the decline of an old friend over the period of a decade in this experiment in low-key realism.
Kris Rothstein
Books and BC Distilled 2017
BC's craft distilling festival inspires me to find books about how and why we drink.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF Live—Beyond the Screen
The traditional cinematic experience is expanding to include live scoring, narrated documentaries and multimedia shows. Thoughts on new directions in storytelling and VIFF Live highlights from programmer Ken Tsui.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival 2019: Race Cards
A provocative art installation invites viewers to think about questions of race: in their lives, in the arts and in the wider world.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival 2019: Marginal Consort
A legendary Japanese improvisational quartet creates sounds both mesmerizing and unexpected.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival 2019: 100 Keyboards
A deep, immersive sound collage develops over an hour and a half, produced by toy keyboards.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: Dreaming Under Capitalism
In this conceptual film, Belgians relate dreams about work.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: United Skates
Roller skating is still going strong in America, but the predominantly African-American roller-rink culture is threatened by racist policy.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: Shirkers
Sandi Tan tells the story of the strange and ambitious film she made in Singapore in the 1990s, and how it was lost and found.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: This Mountain Life
A mother and daughter undertake a months-long, dangerous trek from Vancouver to Alaska across the Coast Mountains.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: Amateurs
Hilarity and social activism in a Swedish town when the local teenagers are invited to make a promotional film.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: What To See
How to choose which films to see this year? Biopics of Colette and Astrid Lindgren; documentaries about science fairs, guitar makers and yoga; weird films about time travel, zombies and playing Pac-Man as civilization crumbles.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: Djon África
A member of the diaspora returns to Cape Verde for a low-key and impressionist homecoming.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: Science Fair
Funny, charismatic and unbelievably smart high school students aspire to win at the International Science and Engineering Fair.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: Le Grand Bal
Wild and riotous French people dance all night long to fiddles and hurdy-gurdies and pipes.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: Relaxer
Wow, what the heck is happening in this totally engrossing tale about a loser who sits on a couch?
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: Spice It Up
No one gets Rene's student film about teen girls who join the army, but will sacrificing her very specific vision mean better art or the loss of something flawed but worthwhile?
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2018: N.O.N.
Greg wanders around Vancouver, looking for a job.
Kris Rothstein
BC Cider Festival 2018
Pours and stories from over thirty cider makers at the Pipe Shop in North Vancouver, a restored heritage building where ships' piping systems were once constructed.
Kris Rothstein
JFL NorthWest 2018: Mike Birbiglia
The finest blend of comedy and story.
Kris Rothstein
JFL Northwest 2018: Ari Shaffir's Renamed Storytelling Show
Five pros tell funny stories about their families.
Kris Rothstein
JFL NorthWest 2018: Beth Stelling
A regular on 'comedians to watch' lists for a couple of years. Stelling can be flippant, dark and crude but is always charming and funny.
Kris Rothstein
JFL NorthWest 2018: Maria Bamford
Comedy genius enraptures loving fans. Yes, I'm biased.
Kris Rothstein
JFL NorthWest 2018: Prepare for Laughs
It is year three for one of Vancouver's newest festivals which offers stand up, sketch and improv comedy from big names and young locals and also includes a program of madcap oddball events like.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival: Radio Rewrite
New music composed by Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood.
Kris Rothstein
PuSh Festival 2018: Let the Art Games Begin
It's been over a decade since PuSh started remaking the artistic landscape of winter in Vancouver. The strangest, most mind-blowing theatre, film, music and dance, sometimes all smushed into the same performance. Make sure you don't miss out!
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2017: Good Luck
A long haunting (and amazing) documentary film shot at two very different mines - one in Serbia and one in Suriname.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2017: Maineland
Chinese teens get their look at America from a rural Maine boarding school in this impressionistic documentary.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2017: The Florida Project
In a landscape littered with the motels and theme parks of a disappointing American dream, a foul-mouthed kid runs wild.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2017: Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story
Digging beneath the surface of a classic Hollywood star who had a secret talent for invention.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF: Papirosen
The weight of the past on an Argentinian family.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2017: Forest Movie
A Vancouver film about experience, atmosphere and letting your mind wander.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2017: 24 Frames
Still photographs are animated into imagined lives by Iranian legend Abbas Kiaromstami.
Kris Rothstein
VIFF 2017: Maison du Bonheur
What defines a person? A beautiful apartment, a smile, a collection of shoes, memories? A Canadian filmmaker in Paris spends a month unraveling and illuminating one woman's life.
Kris Rothstein
Summer road trips, books and cider
It's time to go listen to music in a field, watch an eclipse or seek out strange alcoholic beverages.
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